Department of Sociology and Anthropology

University of Mississippi

Events

  • Wed
    27
    Sep
    2017
    11:00 amMiles College (Fairfield, Alabama)

    Dr. Willa M. Johnson will guest lecture at an educational forum, "Toward Healing and Reconciliation: Lessons from the Holocaust and the Jim Crow South," on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. in the Brown Hall Chapel and Auditorium, Miles College (Fairfield, Alabama). The day-long forum (11:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.) is cohosted by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies and Miles College. The public is invited to attend. There is no fee, but attendees should register for the event at: http://ushmm.org/events/miles-college.

  • Fri
    29
    Sep
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Anne Cafer, Assistant Professor of Sociology. Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Thu
    19
    Oct
    2017
    12:30 pmLamar 555

    David Brunsma, Professor of Sociology, Virginia Tech
    David Embrace, Associate Professor of Sociology & Africana Studies, University of Connecticut

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Fri
    20
    Oct
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    JT Thomas, Assistant Professor of Sociology

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Fri
    10
    Nov
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Don’t call it a comeback ... because it isn’t. Contrary to popular belief and conventional wisdom, black southerners don’t listen to the blues, at least not anymore, at least not the brand of blues characterized by guttural lyrics, lowered fifth notes, and accented downbeats. Not B.B. King. Not Howlin’ Wolf. No Sonny Boy. If this is the case, how do black southerners make sense of and navigate the recent growth of blues tourism and performance scenes in places like the Mississippi Delta? In this talk, Dr. Brian Foster, Assistant Professor of Sociology & Southern Studies, tackles this simple, but as yet unanswered, question, ultimately expanding to a broader conversation about the contemporary social epistemologies of black southerners.

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Wed
    15
    Nov
    2017
    12:00 pmJ. D. Williams Library

    On November 15, Maureen Meyers will give a talk at the J. D. Williams Library as part of their Archives Brown Bag series, and in conjunction with Native American History Month, entitled: "Living, Making, Being: Houses & Craft Production at a 14th Century Native American Village in Southwestern Virginia."

    This talk will discuss the results of 10 years of excavations at the Carter Robinson site, a 14th century mound and village site in southwest Virginia. The occupants of the site made trade goods such as shell beads and gaming stones, and the excavation of six houses revealed each household was engaged in making different items. This summer the UM Field School uncovered a different kind of house, where nothing appears to have been made but the house was burned and rebuilt three times. This talk will discuss the households, craft production, and what recent excavations can tell us about 14th century native groups' lives.

    Everyone is welcome.