Department of Sociology and Anthropology

University of Mississippi
  • Bolivia Field School
    Bolivia Field School program students meet with René Merida, director of the Historical Archives of the Bolivian National Congress.
    Bolivia Field School
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    The Center for Archaeological Research hosts a Public Archaeology Day at Rowan Oak, home of William Faulkner, to learn about ongoing excavation of slave quarters dating to the mid-1800s.
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    Graduate students Joshua Shiers and Grace Meyers examine rock artifacts from an archaeological site.
    Photo by UM Photographer Kevin Bain
    Jodi Skipper, professor of Anthropology & Southern Studies, named a 2017 Humanities Scholar by the Mississippi Humanities Council.
    Incoming 2017 MA students
    Welcome new Sociology and Anthropology graduate students!
    This Aint' Just...
    Brian Foster writes three features for Anthony Bourdain's "No Reservations" on food, race, and music in Mississippi.
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    Center for Population Studies wins share of $1.8 million Kellogg Grant to help build health care workforce in Mississippi Delta.
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  • Upcoming Events


    • Fri
      27
      Apr
      2018
      12:00 pmOverby Auditorium

      Adia Harvey Wingfield
      Professor of Sociology
      Washington University, St. Louis

      The research that is the basis for the talk is a study of how economic and organizational changes to work specifically impact black professionals. One major recent change is that many organizations now state their commitment to and interest in creating a more diverse workforce, yet research shows they rarely do this in ways that tangibly change the numbers of women of all races and minority men at the top levels of organizations. Part of my project investigates the consequences of this paradox for black professionals in high status occupations. Though the research focuses specifically on the health care industry, my findings and conclusions have broad implications for black workers in a variety of professional occupations, as many other industries wrestle with this stated desire for more diversity even while they shed the organizational resources that would enable this to occur. Thus, my presentation will help shed light not just on how this happens in health care, but how this could apply to black faculty who encounter similar organizational processes.

      Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology 2018 Spring Lecture Series.