Department of Sociology and Anthropology

University of Mississippi

Events

  • Thu
    09
    Feb
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 114

    Mississippi Maya Week
    Mark Wolf
    Indiana University East & Queens College New York

    Marc Wolf is an archaeologist with more than two decades of exploring, mapping, and excavating Maya cities in Guatemala, Mexico, Honduras, and Belize. His talk “Mapping Hidden Maya Cities in the Jungles of Guatemala” will feature new information about Maya archaeology in Guatemala. Wolf is an expert topographer and GIS specialist who has worked in Europe and across Central America. He teaches at Indiana University East and is currently pursuing his doctorate at CUNY Queens College New York. 

    Pizza lunch is provided. Contact Carolyn Freiwald for more information at 662-915-6544 or crfreiwa@olemiss.edu.

  • Thu
    09
    Feb
    2017
    1:00 pmLamar 114

    Mississippi Maya Week
    Katherine Miller Wolf
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Indiana University East

    An individual’s life history is recorded in his or her bones. This talk presents the latest discoveries in Maya archaeology from the perspective of a bioarchaeologist who ‘reads’ ancient bones. Dr. Katherine Miller Wolf’s talk “Life and Death in Mesoamerica: What do the Skeletons Tell Us?” describes the work of a bioarchaeologist in the Maya world. Dr. Miller Wolf’s recent research includes the Classic Maya cities of Copan and Ucanal and the early Colonial Mission San Bernabé. She currently teaches at Indiana University East  
     
    Pizza lunch is provided prior to the talk. Contact Carolyn Freiwald for more information at 662-915-6544 or crfreiwa@olemiss.edu.

  • Fri
    10
    Feb
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Spring Lecture Series
    Alexandre Tokovinine
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Alabama

    Alexandre Tokovinine (University of Alabama) will present new epigraphic discoveries about Classic Maya cities in his talk “Empires: Naranjo and Holmul in the shadow of greater powers, 378-744 C.E.” The fates of ancient these Maya cities were not in the hands of their ruling families. Instead external political forces linked to Central Mexico in the 4th century and to dynastic wars in the 7th century transformed the Maya world.

    Contact Carolyn Freiwald for more information at 662-915-6544 or crfreiwa@olemiss.edu.

  • Fri
    10
    Feb
    2017
    2:00 pmBarnard Observatory

    Regina N. Bradley
    Assistant Professor of African American Literature, Armstrong State University

    The Center for the Study of Southern Culture will host "When the South STILL Got Something to Say: A Conversation about Hip Hop in the South" on Friday, February 10 at 2pm in Barnard Observatory. Brian Foster, Assistant Professor of Sociology & Southern Studies will introduce the conversation, and then scholar Regina Bradley will talk with writer Kiese Laymon.

    Dr. Regina N. Bradley is a writer, scholar, and researcher of African American Life and Culture. She is an alumna Nasir Jones HipHop Fellow (Harvard University, Spring 2016) and an Assistant Professor of African American Literature at Armstrong State University in Savannah, GA.

    Her expertise and research interests include hip hop culture, race and the contemporary U.S. South, and sound studies.

    Dr. Bradley’s current book-length project, Chronicling Stankonia: OutKast and the Rise of the Hip Hop South (under contract, UNC Press), explores how Atlanta, GA hip hop duo OutKast influences conversations about the Black American South after the Civil Rights Movement.

    Kiese Laymon is a black southern writer, born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi. Laymon attended Millsaps College and Jackson State University before graduating from Oberlin College. He earned an MFA in Fiction from Indiana University and is currently a Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of Mississippi. Laymon is the author of the novel, Long Division and a collection of essays, How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America, the UK edition released in 2016. Laymon has written essays, stories and reviews for numerous publications including Esquire, ESPN the Magazine, Colorlines, NPR, LitHub, The Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, PEN Journal, Oxford American, The Best American Series, Ebony and Guernica.

    Brian Foster, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Southern Studies, holds a Bachelor’s degree in African American Studies from the University of Mississippi and a Master’s degree in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is currently a PhD candidate in sociology, also at the University of North Carolina.

  • Fri
    24
    Feb
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Spring Lecture Series
    Marcos Mendoza
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Mississippi

    What are working conditions like in Patagonia, at the southernmost end of Latin America? This talk discusses Argentine politics and the plight of seasonal laborers in the Patagonian ecotourism industry, with an eye towards understanding broader transformations in Latin American development issues.

  • Wed
    01
    Mar
    2017
    5:30 amBryant Hall 209

    Willa Johnson
    Associate Professor of Sociology

    Through careful analysis of the life and art of Karl Schwesig, a German Jewish concentration camp survivor, this lecture explores art's unique and powerful lens through which to view the human experiences of trauma and suffering.

    Willa Johnson is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Mississippi. She has been a fellow at Yad Vashem's Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority's International Institute for Holocaust Studies and the Cummings Foundation Fellow at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel's Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies. Over the past eight years, she has conducted historical research at more than 15 repositories of art and archives throughout Israel, Germany, France, and the United States and has conducted interviews with Shoah survivors for her book project, Karl Schwesig's Holocaust Art.

    The lecture is sponsored by The Jewish Federation of Oxford, Mississippi.

  • Wed
    05
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Dr. John Eason
    Assistant Professor of Sociology, Texas A & M University

    Dr. Eason will be visiting on an SEC travel grant. His presentation will be based on his new book, Big House on the Prairie: Rise of the Rural Ghetto and Prison Proliferation (University of Chicago Press).

    Big House on the Prairie

    Big House on the Prairie: Rise of the Rural Ghetto and Prison Proliferation

    John Eason
    University of Chicago Press, 2017

    For the past fifty years, America has been extraordinarily busy building prisons. Since 1970 we have tripled the total number of facilities, adding more than 1,200 new prisons to the landscape. This building boom has taken place across the country but is largely concentrated in rural southern towns.

    In 2007, John M. Eason moved his family to Forrest City, Arkansas, in search of answers to key questions about this trend: Why is America building so many prisons? Why now? And why in rural areas? Eason quickly learned that rural demand for prisons is complicated. Towns like Forrest City choose to build prisons not simply in hopes of landing jobs or economic wellbeing, but also to protect and improve their reputations. For some rural leaders, fostering a prison in their town is a means of achieving order in a rapidly changing world. Taking us into the decision-making meetings and tracking the impact of prisons on economic development, poverty, and race, Eason demonstrates how groups of elite whites and black leaders share power. Situating prisons within dynamic shifts that rural economies are undergoing and showing how racially diverse communities lobby for prison construction, Big House on the Prairie is a remarkable glimpse into the ways a prison economy takes shape and operates.

  • Thu
    06
    Apr
    2017
    2:00 pmLyceum 200

    Maureen Meyers received a grant from the College of Liberal Arts and a WOW grant from the Office for Online Learning to replace the standard textbook in Introduction to Anthropology courses, both face-to-face and online. Unlike other disciplines, anthropology has no online textbook available. Meyers will discuss her experiences looking for and using web-based resources to teach the range of topics covered in this course, including natural selection, human evolution, language, archaeology, and globalization. We hope you can join and share ideas over a cup of coffee/tea!
     
    RSVP is not required, however, to help us know how much refreshment to order we kindly ask that you RSVP if possible.

    RSVP at UM FacChats

  • Fri
    21
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Spring Lecture Series
    Kate McClellan
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Mississippi State University

  • Fri
    28
    Apr
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Spring Lecture Series
    Maureen Meyers
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Mississippi

    This talk presents the results of an analysis of shell bead production from a 14th century Native American mound site. It examines the beads, shell debris, and lithic tools found to identify how the beads were made and who made them. to better understand the role of craft production at frontier sites.

  • Thu
    24
    Aug
    2017
    5:00 - 8:00 PMInnovation Hub at Insight Park

    The University of Mississippi’s McLean Institute for Public Service and Community Engagement will host a virtual reality experience for students in the Catalyzing Entrepreneurship and Economic Development program Thursday, August 24, at the Innovation Hub at Insight Park. Vince Jordan, CEO and president of virtual reality production company Lobaki, will join the 15 Innovation Scholars and Innovation Fellows from 5 to 8 p.m. The students will learn from Jordan, a seasoned entrepreneur, about how he is engaging the community in his work.

  • Tue
    29
    Aug
    2017
    7:00 pmParis-Yates Chapel

    Holocaust Survivor Marion Blumenthal Lazan Speaks at UM in an event free and open to the public. She also plans to speak with local public school groups and UM students Aug. 28, 29 and 30. Sponsored by campus Hillel and the Jewish Federation of Oxford. For more information, see story in UM News.

  • Wed
    06
    Sep
    2017
    7:00 pmNutt Auditorium

    Dr. Rhonda Y. Williams of Vanderbilt University will deliver the 2017 Gilder-Jordan Lecture in Southern Cultural History on Wednesday, September 6, 2017 on the University of Mississippi campus. The lecture will take place at 7pm in Nutt Auditorium.

    Dr. Williams is the John L. Siegenthaler Professor in American History at Vanderbilt University. She is the Founder & inaugural Director of the Social Justice Institute at Case Western Reserve University, as well as the Founder & inaugural Director of the Case Western Postdoctoral Fellowship in African American Studies.

    The author of Concrete Demands: The Search for Black Power in the 20th Century (2015) and the award-winning The Politics of Public Housing: Black Women’s Struggles against Urban Inequality (2005), Williams has been honored by History News Network as a Top Young Historian; the Organization of American Historians as a Distinguished Lecturer; and is listed in the 2009 and 2015 editions of Who’s Who in Black Cleveland. Williams is a recipient of an American Association of University Women Postdoctoral Fellowship and a former Harvard University W.E.B. Du Bois Institute Fellow. She is the co-editor of the recently launched book series, Justice, Power, and Politics, with the University of North Carolina Press and co-editor of Teaching the American Civil Rights Movement.

    Additional information can be found here.

  • Thu
    07
    Sep
    2017
    5:00 pmLamar 555

    The Anthropology Society is having its first meeting of the semester. There will be pizza.

  • Thu
    07
    Sep
    2017
    6:00 pmBrevard 134

    Social bond formations, offspring development, and communication have been extensively studied in many primate species. Dr. Angela Dassow, Assistant Professor of Biology, Carthage College, will explore the evolution of vocal communication in chimpanzees, white-handed gibbons, Rhesus macaques, and cotton-top tamarins to show what we can learn from studying non-human primates.

    Chimpanzees share more than 98% of their DNA with humans. They laugh, show empathy, teach their young to use tools…all traits thought to separate humans from other animals. We can learn about ourselves by studying primates, too, by exploring their behavior, physiology, and genetics.

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Sun
    10
    Sep
    2017
    3:00 pmWinterville Mounds State Park (Greenville, MS)

    On Monday, September 10, Dr. Maureen Meyers will give a talk at Winterville Mounds State Park's museum in Greenville, Mississippi. The title of talk is "Native American History in 10 Objects" and is free and open to the public. Native American refreshments will be served.

    Call 662-390-3974 or 662-334-4684 or visit visit the Winterville Mounds State Park Facebook page for more information.

  • Tue
    12
    Sep
    2017
    4:45 pmNatchez Trace Parkway Visitors Center (Tupelo, MS)

    On Tuesday, September 12, 2017, Robbie Ethridge will present a lecture at the Natchez Trace Parkway Visitors Center in Tupelo, Mississippi, as part of The Chickasaw Celebration, which is a celebration of Chickasaw history and culture in their Mississippi homelands sponsored by the Chickasaw Nation. The events, including dancing by the Chickasaw Dance Troup, begin at 3:30, and Ethridge's lecture, entitled "From Chicaza to Chickasaw: Hernando de Soto and the Transformation of the Chickasaws," is at 4:45-5:30 pm. All are welcome.

  • Wed
    13
    Sep
    2017
    5:30 pmLamar 515

    David Nichols, Professor of History, Indiana State University. Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Thu
    14
    Sep
    2017
    5:30 pmBarnard Observatory

    On Thursday, September 14, 2017, Phi Beta Kappa visiting scholar, Professor Judith Carney, UCLA, will present a lecture entitled "Seeds of Memory: Food Legacies of the Transatlantic Slave Trade," in Barnard Observatory, Tupelo Room at 5:30 pm. All are welcome.

  • Mon
    18
    Sep
    2017
    4:00 pmBarnard Observatory 105

    Learn about how a group of Georgetown University alumni identified and located 212 of the original GU272 members along with over 5,200 of their direct descendants. Richard Cellini, founder of the Georgetown Memory Project, will discuss the history of the group, their ongoing work with descendants, their relationship with Georgetown University, and future plans.

  • Fri
    22
    Sep
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    The National Science Foundation famously funds cutting-edge research in the physical and natural sciences. But even social scientists who realize that NSF supports anthropology and sociology often have misconceptions that can derail a funding proposal--or discourage people from applying in the first place. Dr. Kirk Johnson, Assistant Professor of Sociology & African American Studies, shares his insights as an NSF reviewer in a presentation designed to encourage professors and graduate students to take advantage of NSF's many avenues for supporting research in the social sciences.

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Wed
    27
    Sep
    2017
    11:00 amMiles College (Fairfield, Alabama)

    Dr. Willa M. Johnson will guest lecture at an educational forum, "Toward Healing and Reconciliation: Lessons from the Holocaust and the Jim Crow South," on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. in the Brown Hall Chapel and Auditorium, Miles College (Fairfield, Alabama). The day-long forum (11:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.) is cohosted by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum's Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies and Miles College. The public is invited to attend. There is no fee, but attendees should register for the event at: http://ushmm.org/events/miles-college.

  • Fri
    29
    Sep
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Anne Cafer, Assistant Professor of Sociology. Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Thu
    19
    Oct
    2017
    12:30 pmLamar 555

    David Brunsma, Professor of Sociology, Virginia Tech
    David Embrace, Associate Professor of Sociology & Africana Studies, University of Connecticut

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Fri
    20
    Oct
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    JT Thomas, Assistant Professor of Sociology

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Fri
    10
    Nov
    2017
    12:00 pmLamar 555

    Don’t call it a comeback ... because it isn’t. Contrary to popular belief and conventional wisdom, black southerners don’t listen to the blues, at least not anymore, at least not the brand of blues characterized by guttural lyrics, lowered fifth notes, and accented downbeats. Not B.B. King. Not Howlin’ Wolf. No Sonny Boy. If this is the case, how do black southerners make sense of and navigate the recent growth of blues tourism and performance scenes in places like the Mississippi Delta? In this talk, Dr. Brian Foster, Assistant Professor of Sociology & Southern Studies, tackles this simple, but as yet unanswered, question, ultimately expanding to a broader conversation about the contemporary social epistemologies of black southerners.

    Part of the Department of Sociology & Anthropology Fall Lecture Series.

  • Wed
    15
    Nov
    2017
    12:00 pmJ. D. Williams Library

    On November 15, Maureen Meyers will give a talk at the J. D. Williams Library as part of their Archives Brown Bag series, and in conjunction with Native American History Month, entitled: "Living, Making, Being: Houses & Craft Production at a 14th Century Native American Village in Southwestern Virginia."

    This talk will discuss the results of 10 years of excavations at the Carter Robinson site, a 14th century mound and village site in southwest Virginia. The occupants of the site made trade goods such as shell beads and gaming stones, and the excavation of six houses revealed each household was engaged in making different items. This summer the UM Field School uncovered a different kind of house, where nothing appears to have been made but the house was burned and rebuilt three times. This talk will discuss the households, craft production, and what recent excavations can tell us about 14th century native groups' lives.

    Everyone is welcome.