University of Mississippi

New Publication! Amy McDowell in Qualitative Sociology

McDowell, Amy. 2014. “Warriors and Terrorists: Antagonism as Strategy in Christian Hardcore and Muslim ‘Taqwacore’ Punk Rock.” Qualitative Sociology. 37: 255-276. (Lead Article). A photograph from McDowell’s research is featured as the cover of this issue of Qualitative Sociology.

ABSTRACT: This article contributes to new scholarship in the sociological study of religion, which looks at how people define and communicate religion in secular spheres. I show how U.S. Christian Hardcore and Muslim “Taqwacore” (taqwa means “god consciousness” in Arabic) punks draw on the tools of a punk rock culture that is already encoded with its own set of symbols, rituals and styles to: 1) understand themselves as religious/punk and 2) express religion in punk rock environments. I find that both cases draw on a punk rock motif of antagonism—oppositional attitudes and violent rituals and symbols—to see themselves as religious/punk and express religion in punk in different ways. Christian punks use this motif to condemn other Christians for denouncing punk and create space for Protestant evangelical Christianity in punk. Taqwacores use this motif to criticize Islam for its conservatism as well as non-Muslims for stereotyping Muslims as religious fanatics. In the process, Taqwacores build a space for alienated brown youth who exist on the margins of mainstream American culture and traditional Islam.

Symbols of Exclusion Symposium!

Symposium PDF Poster_F

New Publication by John Green !

Rural America Book Cover
New Publication!!
Green, John J. 2014. “The Status of African Americans in the Rural United States.” In Rural America in a Globalizing World: Problems and Prospects for the 2010s. Edited by Conner Bailey, Leif Jensen, and Elizabeth Ransom. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia Press.

SUMMARY: 

This fourth Rural Sociological Society decennial volume provides advanced policy scholarship on rural North America during the 2010’s, closely reflecting upon the increasingly global nature of social, cultural, and economic forces and the impact of neoliberal ideology upon policy, politics, and power in rural areas.

The chapters in this volume represent the expertise of an influential group of scholars in rural sociology and related social sciences. Its five sections address the changing structure of North American agriculture, natural resources and the environment, demographics, diversity, and quality of life in rural communities.

 

Mississippi Students win best student papers at 2014 Alabama Mississippi Sociological Association Meetings

student award paper2

 

Congratulations to Jamiko Deleveaux (MA student in Sociology) and Emma Willoughby (BA student in Sociology, Anthropology, Biological Science, and Psychology) for their selection as winners of the “best student paper” competitions at the 2014 Alabama Mississippi Sociological Association meetings.  Pictured from left to right:  Jamiko Deleveaux, Dr. John Green, and Emma Willoughby.

 

 

 

Department Houses Two Editorial Offices

 

Dr. Robbie Ethridge, Professor of Anthropology has been appointed Journal Editor for Ethnohistory (North American Editor).  Dr. John Green serves as Editor-in-Chief of Community Development, the official journal of the Community Development Society.

UnknownEthnohistory, published by Duke University Press, is the flagship journal of the American Society for Ethnohistory (ASE). The ASE is the preeminent international organization in its field and Ethnohistory is the top journal in the field in this hemisphere—arguably in the world. And therefore my editorship brings prestige and notice to the university.Ethnohistory, as the name implies, takes as its core the discipline of ethnohistory, which is any scholarship inspired by anthropological and historical approaches to the human condition, and especially the historical experiences of  indigenous, diasporic, and minority peoples. Ethnohistory concentrates on populations in the Americas (North, Central, and South), however, exceptional submissions concerning other areas of the world are also published. The field of ethnohistory, then, is explicitly international and inter-disciplinary, and the journal reflects this by publishing works from the disciplines of geography, literature, sociology, and archaeology, as well as anthropology and history by authors from the world over.  It is considered top-tier in most journal rankings and is cited widely.

 

 

 

rcod20.v044.i03.coverThe University of Mississippi Center for Population Studies now houses the Editorial Office of Community Development, the official journal of the Community Development Society. This peer-reviewed scholarly publication addresses the cutting-edge of knowledge concerning community development research, practice, and policy. It is published by Routledge/Taylor and Francis, with five issues per year. Dr. John Green, Director of the Center for Population Studies and Associate Professor of Sociology, will serve as Editor-in-Chief of the journal.

New Pathways to Health Initiative

The Center for Population Studies (CPS) was recently awarded a three-year subcontract with The Rogosin Institute through its Dreyfus Health Foundation (DHF) division.  This is to support research and evaluation for expansion of the New Pathways to Health Initiative in five Mississippi Delta counties.  Expanding from Last year’s pilot, the New Pathways to Health Initiative is focused on health education, workforce development, and civic engagement with youth (6th through 12th grade), college students, and healthcare practitioners.  Lead partners working with DHF include the Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Inc., Tri-County Workforce Alliance, and Mississippi Office of Nursing Workforce.  These groups are partnering with universities, community colleges, and healthcare facilities in the Delta region of northwest  Mississippi to address critical healthcare workforce shortages and reduce health disparities.  The W.K. Kellogg Foundation is providing funding for these endeavors.  CPS Director Dr. John J. Green recently delivered a presentation in New York City concerning his decade of work in collaboration with DHF, and he highlighted the New Pathways to Health Initiative.

To read a press release from The Rogosin Institute, click here.  To watch a video featuring the New Pathways to Health Initiative, click here. To read more about the New Pathways to Health Initiative, click here.

The New Pathways to Health Initiative, an innovative education and health development program, was featured in the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis publication Bridges. This program involves collaboration between the University of Mississippi Center for Population Studies, Aaron E. Henry Community Health Services Center, Dreyfus Health Foundation of the Rogosin Institute, Mississippi Office of Nursing Workforce, and the Tri-County Workforce Alliance. The publication is available online at https://www.stlouisfed.org/publications/br/articles/?id=2544.

  • Green, John, Molly Phillps, and Katie Kerstetter. 2014. “Creating Opportunity Pathways for Asset Development: The Role of Participatory Problem Solving in the Mississippi Delta.” Bridges: The Quarterly Review of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis Summer: 7-9.

 

Dr. Sander Gilman presents “How Did Anti-Semitism and Racism Become Mental Illness? From Anti-Semitic Vienna to Segregated Topeka, Kansas”

 

 

 

The University of Mississippi Critical Race Studies Group presents Dr. Sander Gilman, Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor of Psychiatry, Emory University.  The title of his talk is, “How Did Anti-Semitism and Racism Become Mental Illnesses?  From Anti-Semitic Vienna to Segregated Topeka, Kansas.”
The talk will take place on Thursday, October 25, 2012, Bryant Hall 209, 5:30 pm.

The next day, Friday, October 26, students can chat informally with Dr. Gilman at a brownbag talk at noon in the Bryant Hall first floor lounge.  Bring your lunch and look forward to the chance to ask questions and hear further reflections on anti-semitism and racism.

Dr. Gilman is a cultural and literary historian and is the author or editor of over eighty books.  He focuses on medicine and how medical rhetoric echoes in social and political discourse.

 

This is the second public lecture of the year-long series entitled Intertwining Legacies: Jews and African Americans in the Deep South.” 
For more information, please see the recent story in the College of Liberal Arts Newsletter, “View from Ventress” by clicking here.
For more information on the Association for Jewish Studies-Legacy Heritage Jewish Studies Project, see http://www.ajsnet.org/legacy.htm

 

Photographs from Dr. Gilman’s visit

Photo Credits: Chelsey Handley

Departmental Accomplishments Featured in “View from Ventress”

Read several news stories about various departmental awards and accomplishments in A View from Ventress, the College of Liberal Arts newsletter.

 

Intertwining Legacies: Jews and African Americans in the Deep South

 

The first public lecture of the year-long series entitled “Intertwining Legacies:  Jews and African Americans in the Deep South” will take place on September 6, 2012 with a presentation by Dr. W. David Nelson of Groton School.

 

W. David Nelson, a noted scholar of the Hebrew Bible (Christian Old Testament), comes to the University of Mississippi from Groton School in Groton, Massachusetts.  In his lecture entitled “Say Again!:  Race, Religion, and Realities of Reading the Bible,” Dr. Nelson will discuss how the Bible has been used to promote racist ideologies such as the Curse of Ham.

The lecture begins at 5:30 p.m. in the Overby Center auditorium.

 

The lecture series is organized by the University of Mississippi Critical Race Studies Group, an interdisciplinary group of scholars who are working to address racial and ethnic inequalities on campus and in academia.   The series would not be possible without the generous funding from the Association for Jewish Studies-Legacy Heritage Jewish Studies Project (AJS-LHJSP). “Intertwining Legacies:  Jews and African Americans in the Deep South” intends to explore different aspects of Jewish and African-American history, specifically focusing on the complex relationship between the two groups in the deep South.

Co-sponsors of the lecture series include the African American Studies Program; the Center for the Study of Southern Culture; the College of Liberal Arts; the Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies; the School of Law; the Trent Lott Leadership Institute; the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation; and the departments of History, Philosophy and Religion, and Sociology and Anthropology.

 

For more information, please see the official University of Mississippi press release.
For more information on the Association for Jewish Studies-Legacy Heritage Jewish Studies Project, see http://www.ajsnet.org/legacy.htm

 

 

Recent Departmental Promotions

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology would like to recognize the following recently promoted faculty members: Ahmet Yukleyen, Kirk Johnson, Willa Johnson, and John Sonnett.  Congratulations!