University of Mississippi

Robbie Ethridge participating in Gilder Lehrman Center’s 15th Annual International Conference

Dr. Robbie Ethridge, Professor of Anthropology, will be participating in Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center’s 15th Annual International Conference, Indigenous Enslavement and Incarceration in North American History. According to the Center’s website, Studies of indigenous slavery have multiplied in the past decade, changing not only the ways we think about slavery, but also race, citizenship, and nation. This conference intends to bring together some of this exciting new work and to trace its effects on and within Native American communities. It does so self-consciously in its expressed focus on slavery and incarceration. Such an emphasis, we hope, connects new slavery scholarship done in early American history with contemporary investigations into incarceration and prison studies.

The Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition “is dedicated to the investigation and dissemination of knowledge concerning all aspects of chattel slavery and its destruction.”  For more information, please visit the conference website.

Ross Haenfler presents “Simple Steps Towards Transformative Teaching”

Ross Haenfler, Associate Professor of Sociology, recently led a Faculty Development Workshop hosted by the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.  If you happened to miss the workshop, “Simple Steps Towards Transformative Teaching,”  you can still download the handout or view the presentation through an iTunes U Podcast.  To view the podcast, click here and then select “Launch Public Site.”  Once the University of Mississippi iTunes U opens, you will should see “Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning” on the list.  Please see a summary of the event below.

Teaching can be transformative, making, in the words of teaching scholar Ken Bain, “a sustained, substantial, and positive influence on how students think, act, and feel.” Yet too often both students and professors leave the college classroom dissatisfied, and large, research-oriented state universities pose barriers to transformative teaching. This presentation will provide practical, actionable ideas towards the goal of encouraging deep learning and creating a more fulfilling experience for students and teachers. Topics will include building rapport, practicing humane teaching, generating excitement and discussion, making lessons relevant, and tapping into our and our students’ creative potential.

 

 

Upcoming Presentation: “Service Learning,” Dr. Albert Nylander and Laura Martin, McLean Institute for Public Service and Community Engagement

On Tuesday, April 23, 2013 at 11:45,  Dr. Albert Nylander and Laura Martin will be the featured presenters at the next Faculty Development Workshop hosted by the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.  Their presentation will focus on engaging and connecting communities and the classroom through service learning.   This workshop will provide more information about the role of the McLean Institute for Public Service and Community Engagement on campus and in communities across the state, and it will provide practical support for faculty members wishing to incorporate service learning in their classrooms. For more information about the workshop or for information about how to RSVP for the event, click here.

 

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Dr. Nylander with students from the University of Mississippi and Mississippi State University on the Alternative Spring Break trip in the Mississippi Delta.

 

 

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Alternative Spring Break students volunteering at Mississippians Engaging in Greener Agriculture (MEGA) in Shelby, MS. Photo by Robert Jordan/ The University of Mississippi

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Ole Miss and State students spent Spring Break learning about social issues through service and reflection in the Delta. Photo by Robert Jordan/The University of Mississippi

Dr. David Embrick presents “Pluralism, Multiculturalism, Diversity, and Inclusion: What Does it all Mean in the Post Civil-Rights Era?”

Embrickpdf (2)Dr. David Embrick, Associate Professor of Sociology and Loyola University-Chicago will present his talk entitled “Pluralism, Multiculturalism, Diversity, and Inclusion:   What Does it all Mean in the Post Civil-Rights Era?”  on Thursday, January 24th at 5:00 pm in the Tupelo Room of the Barnard Observatory.  For more information, see the synopsis of Dr. Embrick’s talk below.  We hope you can join us!
Synopsis:
Diversity” has become one of the most commonly used words by U.S. corporations.  Indeed, many companies claim that they have spent millions, sometimes billions of dollars to create an egalitarian workplace for all workers.  Given the amount of money spent and the increased amount of research that corporations have done on the issue of diversity, we should expect some progress in terms of equality or equal rights for minority and female workers.  However, while there has been a substantial increase in the rise of corporate philosophy espousing diversity, there is also overwhelming data that suggests minorities and women are still unable to obtain opportunities or to achieve success at the same rates as their white male counterparts.  How can we explain the apparent contradictions?  Furthermore, why are many companies that have historically barred minorities and women from their workplace now publicizing their support for racial and gender integration? I suggest that the term “diversity” is ostensibly used by corporations to mean increased access of minorities and women to non-menial positions in corporations, but actually used only to give the illusion of greater access while, in reality, protecting those in power.  The concept of diversity, then, does far greater damage than no attempt to equalize access at all, because it hides the fact that no change is occurring while falsely promising that change will occur in the future.  Using in-depth interviews conducted with 40 middle and senior-level managers and upper-level executive officers from Fortune 1000 companies, I find that many corporations use “diversity” as a shield to hide the fact that nothing has really changed in the structure of U.S corporations.  That is, U.S. corporations have been, and continue to be, exclusive clubhouses for upper class white males.  

 

Dr. Sander Gilman presents “How Did Anti-Semitism and Racism Become Mental Illness? From Anti-Semitic Vienna to Segregated Topeka, Kansas”

 

 

 

The University of Mississippi Critical Race Studies Group presents Dr. Sander Gilman, Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor of Psychiatry, Emory University.  The title of his talk is, “How Did Anti-Semitism and Racism Become Mental Illnesses?  From Anti-Semitic Vienna to Segregated Topeka, Kansas.”
The talk will take place on Thursday, October 25, 2012, Bryant Hall 209, 5:30 pm.

The next day, Friday, October 26, students can chat informally with Dr. Gilman at a brownbag talk at noon in the Bryant Hall first floor lounge.  Bring your lunch and look forward to the chance to ask questions and hear further reflections on anti-semitism and racism.

Dr. Gilman is a cultural and literary historian and is the author or editor of over eighty books.  He focuses on medicine and how medical rhetoric echoes in social and political discourse.

 

This is the second public lecture of the year-long series entitled Intertwining Legacies: Jews and African Americans in the Deep South.” 
For more information, please see the recent story in the College of Liberal Arts Newsletter, “View from Ventress” by clicking here.
For more information on the Association for Jewish Studies-Legacy Heritage Jewish Studies Project, see http://www.ajsnet.org/legacy.htm

 

Photographs from Dr. Gilman’s visit

Photo Credits: Chelsey Handley

Sociology Graduate Student Wins Best Student Paper

Danielle Kerr, a Sociology graduate student, recently presented a paper at the annual meeting of the Alabama-Mississippi Sociological Association in Starkville, Mississippi.  Her paper, “A Closer Look at Population Change in the Gulf Coast and Delta Regions of Mississippi,”  was awarded Best Graduate Student Paper at the meetings.  Congratulations, Danielle!

2012 Spring Lecture Series

The 2012 Spring Lecture Series begins this Friday, February 24th! Throughout the Spring semester, the Department of Sociology and Anthropology will host a variety of lectures highlighting current faculty research.  Click to download the 2012 Lecture Series Announcement.  Please note that lectures will be held in Leavell 212 unless otherwise noted. Everyone is invited to attend!

 

 

Friday, February 24                            
4:00 pm,
Leavell 212                       
Jay Johnson, Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Center for Archaeological Research

Stone Tools and Ritual Behavior at a Prehistoric Ceremonial Center in the Delta

Friday, March 2                                     
12:00 pm, Leavell 212  
Abby Loebenberg, Barksdale Fellow at the Sally McDonnell Barksdale Honors College
Playground Politics and Backyard Bargains:  What Can Children Teach us About an Anthropology of Friendship

Wednesday, March 7
12:00 pm, Barnard Observatory
Barbara Combs,  Assistant Professor of Sociology and Southern Studies
Selma to Montgomery:  The Long March to Freedom 
Southern Studies Brown Bag Lunch and Lecture Series

Friday, March 30
12:00 pm, Leavell 212
John Sonnett, Assistant Professor of Sociology
Musical Bridges and Boundaries: Results from a Survey of Students at the University of Mississippi

Wednesday, April 4
12:00 pm, Barnard Observatory
Jodi Skipper, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Southern Studies
Why I Do the Things I Do:  One Southerner’s Return to a Louisiana Home
Southern Studies Brown Bag Lunch and Lecture Series

Friday, April 13 
12:00 pm, Leavell 212
Eddie Henry, Research Associate and Geophysical Remote Sensing Specialist, Center for Archaeological Research
Testing a Hypothesis of Heterarchy and Structuration Using Geophysical Data from an Unexcavated Adena Burial Mound in Central Kentucky.

Perspectives on the Mississippi Delta

Southern Studies Brown Bag Lunch & Lecture Series, Perspectives on the Mississippi Delta
February 15
Josh Davis, Delta Health Alliance; Amy C. Evans, Oral Historian, Southern Foodways Alliance; John J. Green, Director, Center for Population Studies; Zandria Robinson, Assistant Professor of Sociology & McMullen Assistant Professor of Southern Studies
Noon in Barnard Observatory’s Lecture Hall, Room 105, or the Tupelo Room
Sponsored by The Center for the Study of Southern Culture

Black History Month Events Featuring Sociology and Anthropology Faculty

Black History Month 2012:  A Celebration of Diversity and Culture has begunThroughout the month of February, the University of Mississippi will host a multitude of events including speakers, films, lectures, book signings, and art exhibits. The events listed below feature a diversity of faculty in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.  For a complete listing of events, click to download the Black History Month 2012 pdf.

February 10
Brown Bag by Dr. Michael V. Williams entitled “From Just Can See in the Morning to Can’t See at Night:  Civil Rights Activism and Resistance in the life of Medgar Wiley Evers”
Dr. Michael V. Williams, Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies at Mississippi State University will speak on the life and times of Medgar Evers in Mississippi.
Noon in the Faulkner Room, third floor of the J.D. Williams Library
Sponsored by: Archives & Special Collections, J.D. Williams Library
Contact: Jennifer Ford, jwford@olemiss.edu, 662-915-7639

February 15
Book Signing:  The Holy Seed Has Been Defiled:  The Interethnic Marriage Dilemma in Ezra 9-10  “Hebrew Bible Monographs, 33, Sheffield Phoenix Press”
By author Willa Johnson, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology.
3:30 pm Barns & Noble Bookstore, Student Union
Sponsored by:  Black History Month Committee, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, African American Studies Program, & The Black Faculty & Staff Organization
Contact: Valeria Ross, vross@olemiss.edu

February 15
Southern Studies Brown Bag Lunch & Lecture Series, Perspectives on the Mississippi Delta
Josh Davis, Delta Health Alliance; Amy C. Evans, Oral Historian, Sothern Foodways Alliance; John J. Green, Director, Center for Population Studies; Zandria Robinson, Assistant Professor of Sociology & McMullen Assistant Professor of Southern Studies
Noon in Barnard Observatory’s Lecture Hall, Room 105, or the Tupelo Room
Sponsored by: The Center for the Study of Southern Culture
Contact:  Mary Harwell Howorth, cssc@olemiss.edu

February 21
Keynote Lecture by Marian Wright Edelman, Founder and Director of the Children’s Defense Fund.  She is the first African American woman admitted to the Mississippi Bar.
7:00 pm at the Ford Center of Performing Arts
Sponsored by:  The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies, southern Studies, Subcommittee for Civil Rights Movement, Office of the Dean of Students/Multicultural Affairs

February 29
Book signing:  Medgar Evers: Mississippi Martyr by author Michael Williams, Assistant Professor of History at Mississippi State University
3:30 pm at Barnes & Noble Bookstore, Student Union
Sponsored by: The Black History Month Committee, History Department, African American Studies Program, the Black Faculty & Staff Organizations

March 2
Keynote Lecture by Myrlie Evers-Willams
4:00 pm at Fulton Chapel
Contact: Charles Ross, cross@olemiss.edu
Sponsored by:  Subcommittee on Civil Rights Movement, William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation, The Sarah Isom Center for Women and Gender Studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partnerships in Research: Synergy that Generates Community Benefits and Academic Advancement

 

The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning invites you to a luncheon workshop to be held, Wednesday, February 8th at 12:00 PM, in the Union Ballroom.
Presented by: Dr. Donald Vereen, Jr., MD, MPH, Director of Community Academic Engagement in the Prevention Research Center of the University of Michigan School of Public Health.  In this presentation, Dr. Vereen will address issues including: the spectrum of community-based research, the value added by involving and engaging the community in research endeavors, what the “community” can teach the academy, what the “academy” can teach the community, the emerging emphasis of translating research to practice and to the public, and the challenge of developing and maintaining community/academic partnerships.

Dr. Vereen’s bio can be found here. For more details, see Flyer. Reservations are a necessary. Please RSVP online by 1:00 PM, Friday, 2/3/12. If you require special assistance related to a disability, please contact the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at 662-915-1391. COME EARLY!  We welcome all who are interested, to join us at 11:45 for an opportunity to network and fellowship before the luncheon begins.